Shining a Light on Commitment to Hematology

Shining a Light on Commitment to Hematology

Sriram Krishnaswamy, PhD, and Jeffrey Weitz, MD, FRCPC, are the recipients of the 2019 Ernest Beutler Lecture and Prize. Dr. Ernest Beutler’s first research publication in 1952 initiated his long-standing career in science and eventually hematology. His commitment to...

Final Flourish: Sensational Late-Breaking Abstracts

Each year on the final day of the ASH annual meeting, the Late-Breaking Abstracts (LBAs) Session presents novel, substantive, and groundbreaking research that was not available in time for the standard ASH abstract submission deadline. And if you are still looking for...

A New Era for Sickle Cell Disease, Acute Porphyria, and More

On Monday, the Director of the Division of Hematology Products in the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Ann Farrell, MD, chaired the two special ASH-FDA Joint Symposia focusing on new drugs for nonmalignant and...

From Left Behind to Front and Center

There have been years when the hemostasis and thrombosis community might have felt a little left behind at the ASH annual meeting. However, here in Orlando, sessions on hemostasis and thrombosis were discussed front and center. From the stimulating Friday Scientific...

Presidential Symposium: Big Ideas for Big Data

“In God we trust. All others must bring data.” The amount of data generated from the dawn of humanity until 2003 was 5 exabytes. Since then, 5 exabytes of data are created every two days. There is no doubt that our ability to collect and store data has exponentially...

Two-Hits to Catastrophic

Two-Hits to Catastrophic

In 1971, Alfred Knudson, MD, PhD, originally formulated the two-hit hypothesis, which states that most genes require two mutations for a change to occur; this aided the medical community’s understanding of how tumors form. We now know that the two-hit hypothesis can...

A Disruptive Innovation?

A Disruptive Innovation?

“I just want to be a normal person, doctor,” Greg said, “but that’s not an option.” Greg, 58 years old, underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) three years ago using cells from his brother. The transplant...

Best Donor Choice: It’s in the Eye of the Beholder!

One of the major leaps in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the increasingly successful use of alternative donors, thereby allowing the delivery of a potentially curative transplant to approximately 75 percent of patients who do not have an HLA-matched...

Erythroferrone: A Bone to Pick with Thalassemia

Erythroferrone: A Bone to Pick with Thalassemia

If the results of the past five years are any indication, the era of gene therapy is truly at hand, and nearly 100 years after Thomas Cooley first described the skeletal and morphological changes of the disease in a pair of Detroit children, so, too, is a cure for...

Aging: Attack of the Clones

Aging: Attack of the Clones

“Aging is not lost youth but a new stage of opportunity and strength.” — Betty Friedan (1921-2006) Blood cells originate from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Adult HSCs are maintained in a quiescent state, a state necessary for preserving the self-renewal of stem...

Dazed and Con-Bruised?

In 1971, then-President Richard Nixon declared drug abuse to be “public enemy number one,” and The War on Drugs was born. It has now been nearly 50 years since the dawn of what proved to be a seismic shift in the focus of domestic as well as international law...

SCD Roundup

“No conclusions can be drawn from this case. Not even a definite diagnosis can be made,” James Herrick wrote in 1910 about the case of the first known patient in America with sickle cell disease (SCD), Walter Clement Noel. More than one century later, we seem to be...

The Road to Wisdom: ASH-ASPHO Pediatric Choosing Wisely Collaboration

“We are made wise not by the recollection of our past, but by the responsibility for our future.”  - George Bernard Shaw The Choosing Wisely® campaign is an effort led by the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) to support and engage physicians in improving...

Cutting Costs for CML Abroad

Cutting Costs for CML Abroad

“If you have to get cancer,” I once reassured a frightened patient, “CML [chronic myeloid leukemia] isn’t bad.” CML is truly one of our cancer success stories. The identification of a single genetic swap — BCR-ABL — and the development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors...

The Roman God of Portals and More

The Roman God of Portals and More

In 1951 a renowned hematologist from Harvard University, William Dameshek, MD, wrote an editorial in Blood providing seminal insight into myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) — a group of disorders characterized by expansion of different myeloid lineages, with...

One-Size-Fits-All for AML? Not Anymore

Once upon a time, there was “7+3.” Developed in the 1970s, this easy-to-remember induction chemotherapy regimen for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) went largely unchanged for decades. But in the past few years, we have seen multiple new drug approvals, and not just for...

I AM IRONMAN!

If you’re a nerd like... Scratch that...If you’re in Orlando this week, it’s either because you have a favorite blood cell type (gotta be the sea blue histiocyte) or you still haven’t given up on your childhood dream of being a Disney hero/heroine (my Halloween...

Blood Counts: Reducing the Burden of Red Blood Cell Transfusions

The first transfusions in the 19th century were rife with adverse events, poor outcomes, and even patient deaths. To no one’s surprise then, medical providers became dubious of this “dangerous” procedure. It was after Landsteiner and Jansky independently identified...

Constructing an Idea: From Wings to Landing Gear

“Great ideas need landing gear as well as wings.” — Charles Douglas Jackson In the Special-Interest Session, Systems-Based Hematology: How to Implement Evidence-Based Programs for Virtual Hematology Consults and Anticoagulation Stewardship, Michal Rose, MD, and Jean...

Sunday’s Continuing Conversations With the Speakers

Continuing Conversations with the Speakers sessions allow for informal discussions with Scientific Program session speakers that will give interested individuals, especially trainees and junior investigators, increased accessibility both to information on the topic...

Trainees Strengthen Their Drive for Hematology at ASH-a-Palooza!

Trainees Strengthen Their Drive for Hematology at ASH-a-Palooza!

My first question was critical: What kind of gifts will ASH-a-Palooza bear this year? Formerly known as “Trainee Day,” the now reinvented ASH-a-Palooza was a half-day, interactive tour de force of learning, networking, and mentorship. There were also, of course,...

Mission (Im)Possible

The year 1982 heralds the discovery of the first mutated genes to be identified in cancer, RAS. The three RAS genes — KRAS, NRAS, and HRAS — still constitute the most frequently mutated oncogene family in human cancers. However, despite more than three decades of...

Oh, How Far We’ve Come!

Since I was little, I’ve been surrounded by scientific intrigue. One of my first memories of the idea of moving genetic material into a person was from my early high school days. When discussing gene transfer, a classmate asked, “So, we could make people blue by...

Saturday’s Continuing Conversations With the Speakers

Continuing Conversations With the Speakers sessions allow for informal discussions with Scientific Program session speakers that will give interested individuals, especially trainees and junior investigators, increased accessibility both to information on the topic...

A Quantum Leap in Myeloma Therapy

More than a century ago, the brilliant physicist Max Planck investigated an obscure subject and sparked a revolution in physics. A profoundly conservative thinker, Planck had to disavow some orthodox theoretical ideas to assume that the total energy of all atoms at...

Lymphoma Roundup: Verdict on This Year’s Annual Meeting

Since Thomas Hodgkin’s initial characterization of lymphomas in 1832 and the first administration of mustard to a patient with lymphoma 100 years later amid the secrecy of a World War II gas program, much has changed. Multiple recurrent themes characterize the...

Invisible Warriors

In the social media community of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) and their advocates, the moniker of “sickle cell warrior” has been widely adopted to unify those who struggle daily with the burden of this relentless disease. Yet, for far too many of them,...

2019 Outstanding Abstract Achievement Awards

ASH is pleased to recognize the following abstract presenters who received the highest ranking in their categories of undergraduate student, medical student, graduate student, resident physician, and post-doctoral fellow. Outstanding Abstract Achievement Award winners...

Update on Precision Medicine Initiatives

Applying the principles of precision medicine to hematologic diseases is a priority for ASH. Precision medicine encompasses all approaches that use patient- and disease-specific information to prevent, diagnose, and treat a disease. The increasingly widespread use of...

Special Sessions Offer Inside Look at Peer Review

This year’s meeting will offer two Special-Interest Sessions tailored for all those who have an interest in learning more about both sides of the peer review process. First Editor-in-Chief of Blood Bob Löwenberg, MD, PhD, will lead the discussion “How to Get Published...

ASH Clinical Practice Guidelines Update

ASH has long recognized the need for comprehensive guidelines and in the past three years has broken ground on developing and/or updating guidelines on several disease types, including venous thromboembolism (VTE), immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), acute myeloid leukemia...

Update on ASH Immunotherapies Initiatives

The field of immunotherapy has generated novel immune-based strategies and improved the utility of existing treatment options for various hematologic diseases. As such, ASH has had an enduring interest in improving immunotherapies for all hematologic diseases. This is...

Understanding Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in Hematology

The ASH Women in Hematology Working Group invites you to attend a thought-provoking, interactive lecture and reception that looks to recognize the value and impact of women in our field. Julie K. Silver, MD, of Harvard Medical School, will be speaking on Accelerating...

ASH RC Update

The ASH Research Collaborative (ASH RC) is a nonprofit organization established by ASH in 2018 to foster collaborative partnerships to accelerate progress in hematology and improve the lives of people affected by blood diseases. This two-part initiative consists of...

ASH Practice Partnership Lunch Spotlights Genomic/Genetic Testing

The ASH Practice Partnership is the Society’s network of practice-based hematologists with interests in practice-related policies, quality of care, new health care delivery systems, and practice management issues. The ASH Practice Partnership Lunch is a special...

A One-of-a-Kind “How I Treat” Experience

Hearing the words “How I Treat” might stir up a diverse array of concepts for hematologists. It can refer to both the popular compendium series of Blood articles as well as the format of talks given at the ASH Meeting on Hematologic Malignancies, but it is always...

With Diversity As a Priority, Everyone Wins

With Diversity As a Priority, Everyone Wins

Griffin Rodgers, MD, of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) is awarded the 2019 ASH Award for Leadership in Promoting Diversity. Dr. Rodgers earned the prestigious recognition for his ongoing work on behalf of under-represented...

New This Year: Trials in Progress

New This Year: Trials in Progress

New this year, abstracts describing innovative Trials in Progress (TiPs; i.e., trials that have not reached the primary endpoint) will be presented at this year’s ASH annual meeting. TiP abstracts are expected to provide investigators with opportunities to discuss...

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